My Favorites Are Usally Red Headed

toocooltobehipster:

dog escapes cage, then releases other dogs at dog kennel [video]

Planet of the dogs

smartgirlsattheparty:

It’s never too late to be great!

smartgirlsattheparty:

It’s never too late to be great!

avataraandy:

The lambs I would sacrifice for a ‘Gotham Academy’ spinoff though. 

avataraandy:

The lambs I would sacrifice for a ‘Gotham Academy’ spinoff though. 

oh-totoro:

"I can only create animation in 2D. There is no other choice for me. I don’t even know how to use a Smartphone." - Hayao Miyazaki

oh-totoro:

"I can only create animation in 2D. There is no other choice for me. I don’t even know how to use a Smartphone." - Hayao Miyazaki

(via Green Lake Picture — Scuba Diver Photo — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

howtobeafuckinglady:

Dior Couture Fall 2005 

I seriously thought this was a fashion show of Disney princess dresses.

(via I Hope To God That’s Batman | WeKnowMemes)
intergalacticju:

opticallyaroused:

A Painting Made From Pieces of Glass



At display in 'Fly the Baku Exhibit'

intergalacticju:

opticallyaroused:

A Painting Made From Pieces of Glass

image

At display in 'Fly the Baku Exhibit'

clatterbane:

youneedacat:

wire-man:

askamericatheheroyeah:

seriffluoride:

carrying—my—crosses:

doodlee-a:

GUYS, THIS IS IMPORTANT. I’ve been a lifeguard for four years, and I didn’t fully appreciate this until a little kid jumped into the shallow end of the lap pool. He wasn’t flailing. His eyes were wide in panic and h would try and push himself off the bottom, but the water was right over his head. It took me a couple seconds to register what had happened, and fortunately, another swimmer right beside the kid managed to grab him when he saw my reaction.

My mother and I run a water safety non-profit organization and this is one of the things we teach.In movies someone who is drowning always yells and screams and it’s very dramatic and obvious but in real life you really have to be paying attention


I was on holiday in Egypt when I was 14, and there was a 4-year-old Italian boy I had to save because no-one else even thought he was in trouble. Luckily, the water wasn’t too deep and only came up to my waist, but the kid was so small it covered his head. All he did was gasp for air and angle his head up, and tried kicking off the pool floor while reaching his hands up. I sat him on the edge of the pool in the shallow end and then his mother came over and thanked me.
I didn’t think much of it then, but I saved a life that day.
THIS COULD LITERALLY SAVE A LIFE.

After 2 years of lifeguarding and many more of competitive swimming I can verify this. Drowning signs are eerily quiet. It helps to catch them early. The pool I worked at had a large amount of regular clients. I’d always keep an extra lookout for people I didn’t recognize since I didn’t know their swimming ability. Their face aiming towards the sky is the first thing they’ll almost always do. Especially children.

This happened to me.  I was lucky someone pulled me out of the ocean last time I went swimming there.  I had no idea that the horrifying experience I had was ‘drowning’ until I read a post like this one.

Reblogging again because this is important.
Very much like with choking, if someone is able to yell and flail around much, they’re at least getting some air. I guess I figured that most people would know that real drowning doesn’t look like the dramatic fictional version, but yeah. My mom used to be a lifeguard and taught me what to look for, and I also saw one of my cousins drowning in the Chesapeake when we were kids. (Luckily, his dad saw what was happening and pulled him out in time.) When people are in real trouble, it’s usually very quiet because their lungs are full of water. :/

I’m also a lifeguard and one more important thing to note is that children age four and under have bigger heads in proportion to their bodies and that it is the heaviest part of their body. For this reason when they go into the instinctive drowning response they probably will not be looking up but they will have their face down in the water because their head is so heavy they can’t get it up. Their hands will hit against the surface of the water in attempt to push their head up but this commonly looks like they are trying to swim.
I’ve had a few saves from distress and drowning but the main reasons I call in a nurse are for kids who gotten too much sun, not enough hydration, and/or not taking breaks/rest and become worn out. And although it is rare there is such a thing as dry drowning.

clatterbane:

youneedacat:

wire-man:

askamericatheheroyeah:

seriffluoride:

carrying—my—crosses:

doodlee-a:

GUYS, THIS IS IMPORTANT. I’ve been a lifeguard for four years, and I didn’t fully appreciate this until a little kid jumped into the shallow end of the lap pool. He wasn’t flailing. His eyes were wide in panic and h would try and push himself off the bottom, but the water was right over his head. It took me a couple seconds to register what had happened, and fortunately, another swimmer right beside the kid managed to grab him when he saw my reaction.

My mother and I run a water safety non-profit organization and this is one of the things we teach.

In movies someone who is drowning always yells and screams and it’s very dramatic and obvious but in real life you really have to be paying attention

I was on holiday in Egypt when I was 14, and there was a 4-year-old Italian boy I had to save because no-one else even thought he was in trouble. Luckily, the water wasn’t too deep and only came up to my waist, but the kid was so small it covered his head. All he did was gasp for air and angle his head up, and tried kicking off the pool floor while reaching his hands up. I sat him on the edge of the pool in the shallow end and then his mother came over and thanked me.

I didn’t think much of it then, but I saved a life that day.

THIS COULD LITERALLY SAVE A LIFE.

After 2 years of lifeguarding and many more of competitive swimming I can verify this. Drowning signs are eerily quiet. It helps to catch them early. The pool I worked at had a large amount of regular clients. I’d always keep an extra lookout for people I didn’t recognize since I didn’t know their swimming ability. Their face aiming towards the sky is the first thing they’ll almost always do. Especially children.

This happened to me.  I was lucky someone pulled me out of the ocean last time I went swimming there.  I had no idea that the horrifying experience I had was ‘drowning’ until I read a post like this one.

Reblogging again because this is important.

Very much like with choking, if someone is able to yell and flail around much, they’re at least getting some air. I guess I figured that most people would know that real drowning doesn’t look like the dramatic fictional version, but yeah. My mom used to be a lifeguard and taught me what to look for, and I also saw one of my cousins drowning in the Chesapeake when we were kids. (Luckily, his dad saw what was happening and pulled him out in time.) When people are in real trouble, it’s usually very quiet because their lungs are full of water. :/

I’m also a lifeguard and one more important thing to note is that children age four and under have bigger heads in proportion to their bodies and that it is the heaviest part of their body. For this reason when they go into the instinctive drowning response they probably will not be looking up but they will have their face down in the water because their head is so heavy they can’t get it up. Their hands will hit against the surface of the water in attempt to push their head up but this commonly looks like they are trying to swim.

I’ve had a few saves from distress and drowning but the main reasons I call in a nurse are for kids who gotten too much sun, not enough hydration, and/or not taking breaks/rest and become worn out. And although it is rare there is such a thing as dry drowning.